Vol. 13 No. 1 (2018)
Articles

First report of <em>Bufo bufo</em> (Linnaeus, 1758) from Sardinia (Italy)

Ilaria Maria Cossu
Sezione Sardegna SHI, Societas Herpetologica Italica, Via Marconi 8, 09070 Seneghe, Oristano, Italy
Salvatore Frau
Sezione Sardegna SHI, Societas Herpetologica Italica, Via Marconi 8, 09070 Seneghe, Oristano, Italy
Massimo Delfino
Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università di Torino, Via Valperga Caluso 35, 10125 Torino Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Edifici ICP, Campus de la UAB s/n, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain
Alice Chiodi
Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e dell'Ambiente, Università di Pavia, Via Ferrata 9, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Claudia Corti
Sezione Sardegna SHI, Societas Herpetologica Italica, Via Marconi 8, 09070 Seneghe, Oristano, Italy Museo di Storia Naturale dell’Università di Firenze, Sezione di Zoologia “La Specola”, Via Romana 17, 50125 Firenze, Italy
Adriana Bellati
Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e dell'Ambiente, Università degli Studi di Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, Pavia, Italy
Published December 22, 2017
How to Cite
Cossu, I. M., Frau, S., Delfino, M., Chiodi, A., Corti, C., & Bellati, A. (2017). First report of <em>Bufo bufo</em&gt; (Linnaeus, 1758) from Sardinia (Italy). Acta Herpetologica, 13(1), 43-49. https://doi.org/10.13128/Acta_Herpetol-21867

Abstract

The Common toad Bufo bufo (Linneaus, 1758) was found for the first time in Sardinia in 2016 during herpetological surveys. The species appears to be well established in the finding area. Many adults and juveniles, tadpoles at different developmental stages, and eggs have been found during repeated monitoring. In order to infer the geographic origin of the Sardinian population, we amplified two mitochondrial markers (16S, cytb) and compared sequences with those available for the species across its natural range. We also screened samples for the presence of Bd pathogen to assess the risk of infection mediated by the species in the area. Results suggest that Sardinian individuals are genetically close to the Central Italian populations, although they show a unique distinct haplotype. Though the species should be considered allochthonous to the Island, further molecular and ecological data are urgently needed to assess the genetic structure and the possible impact on the local fauna, which is largely composed by endemic taxa. Particularly, possible interactions with other native amphibians like the green toad Bufo balearicus (Boettger, 1880), also present in the area, should be investigated, both in terms of competition for breeding sites and genetic pollution, as these species are already known to hybridize in the wild.

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