TECHNE 17 (2019): Horizontality/verticality in architecture
Research & Experimentation

Up-one: problems issuing from upward extensions of 1950-1900 residential buildings

Angelo Bertolazzi
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Edile e Ambientale, Università degli Studi di Padova, Italia
Marco Campagnola
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Edile e Ambientale, Università degli Studi di Padova, Italia
Giorgio Croatto
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Edile e Ambientale, Università degli Studi di Padova, Italia
Agata Maniero
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Edile e Ambientale, Università degli Studi di Padova, Italia
Umberto Turrini
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Edile e Ambientale, Università degli Studi di Padova, Italia
Alberto Vignato
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Edile e Ambientale, Università degli Studi di Padova, Italia
Published January 17, 2019
Keywords
  • Regeneration,
  • Building raising,
  • Residential buildings,
  • Soil consumption
How to Cite
Bertolazzi, A., Campagnola, M., Croatto, G., Maniero, A., Turrini, U., & Vignato, A. (2019). Up-one: problems issuing from upward extensions of 1950-1900 residential buildings. TECHNE - Journal of Technology for Architecture and Environment, (17), 232-240. https://doi.org/10.13128/Techne-24005

Abstract

Though presenting typological and construction-related features different from other European countries, Italian residential buildings as a whole fail to meet the performances required by the European Union before the 2050 deadline. Among the hypotheses meant to upgrade residential buildings, adding floors is regarded as capable of meeting the demand for new lodgings without any further soil consumption as well as of being the driving force leading to the overall upgrading of the building. The research has been aimed at focusing on the problems arising from upward extensions within the Italian seismic context, by means of digital environment surveys, defining intervention guidelines that can be applied to adding floors to 1950-2000 buildings.

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